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Expert recommendation from the Swiss Amyloidosis Network (SAN) for systemic AL-amyloidosis

Review article: Medical guidelines
Schwotzer R, Flammer AJ, Gerull S, Pabst T, Arosio P, Averaimo M, Bacher VU, Bode P, Cavalli A, Concoluci A, Dirnhofer S, Djerbi N, Dobner SW, Fehr T, Garofalo M, Gaspert A, Heimgartner R, Hübers A, Jung HH, Kessler C, Knöpfel R, Laptseva N, Manka R, Mazzucchelli L, Meyer M, Mihaylova V, Monney P, Mylonas A, Nkoulou R, Pazhenkottil A, Pfister O, Rüfer A, Schmidt A, Seeger H, Stämpfli SF, Stirnimann G, Suter T, Théaudin M, Treglia G, Tzankov A, Vetter F, Zweier M, Gerber B
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20364

These are the Swiss Amyloidosis Network recommendations which focus on diagnostic work-up and treatment of AL-amyloidosis. One aim of this meeting was to establish a consensus guideline regarding the diagnostic work-up and the treatment recommendations for systemic amyloidosis tailored to the Swiss health care system.

Conference report: dementia research and care and its impact in Switzerland

Special article
Leyhe T, Jucker M, Nef T, Sollberger M, Riese F, Haba-Rubio J, Verloo H, Lüthi R, Becker S, Popp J
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20376

A Swiss panel of experts met for the Dementia Summit in Brunnen, Switzerland, to discuss the latest scientific findings on basic and clinical research, as well as practical and political approaches to the challenges of dementia disorders in Switzerland. Here, they present the conference summary.

Immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy-associated encephalitis: a case series and review of the literature

Original article
Stuby J, Herren T, Schwegler Naumburger G, Papet C, Rudiger A
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20377

Encephalitis should be suspected in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors who present with rapidly evolving confusion. Blood tests, CSF analysis, cerebral MRI and an EEG should be performed. Therapy with intravenous corticosteroids is recommended. Steroid unresponsiveness is rare and should lead to a review of the diagnosis. Alternative treatment options are IVIG, plasma exchange therapy and rituximab.

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome with refractory cardiogenic shock due to acute myocarditis and mononeuritis multiplex after SARS-CoV-2 infection in an adult

Original article
Othenin-Girard A, Regamey J, Lamoth F, Horisberger A, Glampedakis E, Epiney JB, Kuntzer T, de Leval L, Carballares M, Hurni CA, Rusca M, Pantet O, Di Bernardo S, Oddo M, Comte D, Piquilloud L
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20387

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with SARS-CoV-2 can occur in adults. The clinical presentation can include severe organ damage with features of incomplete or complete Kawasaki disease, including coronary aneurysm, as well as myocarditis-associated cardiogenic shock and also mononeuritis multiplex.

Outcomes after spinal stenosis surgery by type of surgery in adults aged 60 years and older

Original article
Degen T, Fischer K, Theiler R, Schären S, Meyer OW, Wanner G, Chocano-Bedoya P, Simmen HP, Schmid UD, Steurer J, Stähelin HB, Mantegazza N, Bischoff-Ferrari HA
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20325

Homonymous visual field defects in patients with multiple sclerosis: results of computerised perimetry and optical coherence tomography

Original article
Schmutz L, Borruat FX
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20319

Homonymous visual field defects can be the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis and have a relatively good prognosis. The incidence of HVFD in multiple sclerosis is unknown, as it is probably underdiagnosed. 

Understanding the mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects

Review article: Biomedical intelligence
Frisaldi E, Shaibani A, Benedetti F
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20340

The placebo effect represents an elegant model to understand how the brain works. It is worth knowing that there is not a single but many placebo effects, with different mechanisms across different systems, medical conditions and therapeutic interventions.

When a T cell engages a B cell: novel insights in multiple sclerosis

Review article: Biomedical intelligence
Jelcic I, Sospedra M, Martin R
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20330

This short review summarises important new insights into the interaction between these two cell populations and outlines recent observations regarding how memory B cells activate brain-homing autoreactive T cells in multiple sclerosis.

Multidisciplinary care in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a 4-year longitudinal observational study

Original article
Sukockienė E, Iancu Ferfoglia R, Truffert A, Héritier Barras AC, Genton L, Viatte V, Leuchter I, Escher M, Horie N, Poncet A, Pasquina P, Adler D, Janssens JP
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20258

The cellular prion protein beyond prion diseases

Review article: Biomedical intelligence
Manni G, Lewis V, Senesi M, Spagnolli G, Fallarino F, Collins SJ, Mouillet-Richard S, Biasini E
Swiss Med Wkly. 2020;150:w20222

The cellular prion protein (PrPC), a cell surface glycoprotein originally identified for its central role in prion diseases, has recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This article provides an overview of what is known about the role of PrPC beyond prion disorders and discusses the potential implications of targeting this protein in different diseases.

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